Banner Fort Collins Medical Center

WIN 2017

Spirit of Women magazine is a national publication presented to women by hospitals and their physicians. The magazine provides up-to-date, evidence-based healthcare information and promotes our hospitals as leaders in women's health excellence.

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29 habits, there's a much higher likelihood of injury." In other words, no more skimping on stretching. More than ever before, the need to cross-train becomes mandatory. Let's say you have run five days a week your whole life and it's starting to hurt. Dr. Snyder sees quite a few patients like that. "I usually tell them, it's probably not a good idea to keep running five days a week. I'm not saying you can't run, but maybe you should try only running three days a week and incorporating other types of exercise. Low impact exercises like swimming, bicycling, elliptical machine, and walking are all good breaks to give your knees a rest." PSYCHOLOGY Add to the changes in 40, 50, or 60-year-old bodies is the psychology of being an aging athlete. When all your personal records were in your 20s, it can be discouraging to notice a downward slump in your bests. Richard Williams, MD, orthopedic surgeon advises compassion for your older body. "It's important for all of us not to compare ourselves to our 20-year-old self. Tissue changes and lifestyle changes, like sitting more due to work, mean things will be different. Nobody beats father time." Stay active, but don't worry about getting different results. Perhaps even consider switching to a new sport where you can set new personal bests. Interestingly, the knee surgeons report that they see much higher re-tear rates of ACL repairs [knee ligament] in 20-somethings rather than older patients. Dr. Williams says, "Some of that, we believe, is because younger patients are exposing themselves to more extreme, intense sporting activities." So, aging isn't all bad. Perhaps wisdom is a fair substitute for stiffer tendons. Even though older athletes have to balance workouts with family and work, the effort to keep moving is worth it in health benefits. Dr. Dupuis says the key is balance. "In my practice, I see people who are inactive with more problems like arthritis than people who are active. They've often got other medical problems contributing to that like carrying extra weight around on their knees. Being overweight can cause them to change some of their mechanics, and they start to wear out part of their knees faster." On the other hand, patients who refuse to slow down can see overuse injuries. "I think we have to find that balance of keeping people active, but not overusing [ joints] to the point that they're breaking down," she says. INJURY If, after all that prevention, something still ends up aching, Banner Health Clinic has got you covered with their orthopedics and sports medicine specialists. With clinics in Greeley, Fort Collins, and Loveland, you can get expedient care no matter where you live in northern Colorado. By calling the main number, (970) 810-0020, you can make an appointment at the most convenient location for you. These doctors of bone, joint, ligament, muscle, and tendon are widely available because while your goal may have been to avoid the pain of injury, they know that injuries do happen. Dr. Heaston sums it all up. "Our number one goal is to get patients back to the sport that they want to play, at the level they want to play at. If that means rehabbing and preventing surgery, we're all for it. If that means biting the bullet and getting surgery done sooner so they can get back to play at a younger age limit, absolutely. We'll do it. We just want to keep people at their level of play and enjoying the activities that they enjoy doing." "Prevention for knee injury, no matter your gender, is core stabilization. Also, pay attention to jumping mechanics, like for basketball. Make sure you're landing properly so you don't create unbalanced forces in your knee." Garrett Snyder, MD, Banner Health Clinic orthopedic surgeon "It's important for all of us not to compare ourselves to our 20-year- old self. Tissue changes and lifestyle changes, like sitting more due to work, mean things will be different. Nobody beats father time." Richard Williams, MD, Banner Health Clinic orthopedic surgeon "Our number one goal is to get patients back to the sport that they want to play, at the level they want to play at." Daniel Heaston, MD, Banner Health Clinic orthopedic surgeon SHUT TERSTOCK / DR. COLLEEN DUPUIS, DR. RICHARD WILLIAMS, DR. GARRET T SNYDER, AND DR. DANIEL HEASTON PHOTOS BY ERIK STENBAKKEN/STENBAKKEN.COM

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