Touro Infirmary

FALL 2013

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Recipes Cocoa-Hazelnut Spread 1 cup blanched hazelnuts (see note) 1 PLACE hazelnuts and oil in bowl of food processor with steel blade. GRIND to a creamy mass, scraping down bowl occasionally, about 2 minutes. ADD cocoa and powdered milk. PROCESS until creamy. ADD confectioners' sugar, vanilla and salt, and process again until creamy, about 2 minutes, scraping down bowl occasionally. STORE, covered, in the refrigerator; USE within a few days. 1 Makes 6 (2 tablespoon) servings. 1 tablespoon canola oil 3 tablespoons natural unsweetened cocoa powder 2 tablespoons nonfat powdered milk 1 /3 cup confectioners' sugar /4 teaspoon vanilla extract /4 teaspoon salt Per serving: 182 calories / 14 grams total fat / 4 grams protein / 13 grams carbohydrates / Cocoa tips Although health experts say cocoa shouldn't be thought of as a health food, a tablespoon of unsweetened dry cocoa powder does have close to two grams of dietary fber, as much as a slice of whole-wheat bread or a medium-size tomato, with only 12 calories and less than a gram of total fat. "Cocoa, like alcohol, can be part of a healthy diet, but not a replacement for a healthy diet," says Dr. Timothy S. Harlan at Tulane University School of Medicine. Use cocoa to favor your favorite beverages and snacks and even savory dishes. Or, add a small amount to a yogurt or smoothie for chocolate favor without a lot of calories. 0.5 milligrams cholesterol / 105.5 milligrams sodium / 3 grams dietary fiber Note: If blanched hazelnuts aren't available, place skin-on hazelnuts in heavybottomed skillet over medium heat. Shake constantly until skins begin to pull back and nuts are fragrant, about 1 to 3 minutes. Watch carefully so nuts don't burn. Remove nuts from heat and place in towel. Rub to remove skins. Cocoa Chicken Mole Olive oil cooking spray 3 boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut in bite-size pieces 1 small red onion, chopped 1 medium garlic clove, minced 1 medium red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped 1 /2 cup chicken broth 1 (14.5-ounce) can no-salt added diced, roasted tomatoes 1 (15-ounce) can pinto beans, drained and rinsed SPRAY oil in large, heavy-bottomed pot. ADD chicken and brown over mediumhigh heat, about 3 minutes. REMOVE chicken; set aside. SPRAY oil again. ADD onion, garlic and bell pepper to pot. SAUTÉ for 7 to 10 minutes, until vegetables are tender, stirring frequently. POUR in broth and stir up browned bits in pot. STIR in tomatoes, beans, chiles, cocoa, cumin and salt. COVER pot, reduce heat to low and simmer 30 minutes. To serve, SPOON into 4 shallow bowls. TOP each serving with 1 tablespoon each of sour cream and scallions. Makes 4 (1¼ cup) servings. 2 canned chipotle chiles in adobo sauce, minced 2 teaspoons natural unsweetened cocoa powder 3 /4 teaspoon ground cumin /2 teaspoon salt 36.5 grams protein / 26 grams carbohydrates / 146 milligrams cholesterol / 586 milligrams sodium / 7 grams dietary fiber A DOSE OF COCOA The exact amount of cocoa you should consume to achieve health benefits is still uncertain, but Dr. Harlan says that "most of the cocoa studies are a serving a day, which would be about two tablespoons of cocoa." And experts agree that the less sugar and fat you add to cocoa, the more healthful it will be. • 1 /4 cup reduced-fat sour cream 1 /4 cup minced scallions w w w. s p i r i t o f w o m e n . c o m FA L L 2 013 SPI RIT O F WOM EN PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE PETKOV 1 Per serving: 267 calories / 9 grams total fat / But before you trade your carrot sticks for a cup of hot cocoa, here's what nutrition experts and food scientists also want you to know: Although cocoa is rich in plant nutrients, there's some breakdown of flavonols during processing, says Laura Shumow, chocolate scientist for the National Confectioners Association, Washington D.C. When cocoa is treated with an alkali (Dutch process) to neutralize the acidity, the process also causes some degradation of the flavonols. That means you'll get more flavonols for the calories in a cocoa powder than in a chocolate bar, Shumow says. "If I went into a store to choose a product with the highest flavonols and lowest calories, I would go with natural powder," she says. 7

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