New York Presbyterian

FALL 2014

Spirit of Women magazine is a national publication presented to women by hospitals and their physicians. The magazine provides up-to-date, evidence-based healthcare information and promotes our hospitals as leaders in women's health excellence.

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8 S P I R I T O F W O M E N FA L L 2 014 w w w. s p i r i t o f w o m e n . c o m F I N A N C I A L F I T N E S S SHUTTERSTOCK DIY DOs If you're determined to do it yourself, Lipford recommends these easy projects that offer immediate results: • Laminate flooring. There is a whole DIY-friendly category of floors that are easy to install and that will look great when finished. • Insulation. Adding unfaced insulation to your attic is an immediate money saver in summer or winter. • Hardware replacement. Cabinet knobs, doorknobs and hinges really spruce things up and can be done in stages as you have time. • Painting. Adding color to a wall can completely change the look of a room. • H iring a contractor can be pricey, so it's logi- cal to try to save money by doing a home improvement project yourself. But before you do, take the advice of Dan- ny Lipford, host of the nationally syndicated television show "Today's Homeowner with Danny Lipford," and ask yourself these three questions: Do I have the time? Do I have the skill? Do I have the patience? LOOK TO THE PROS Drywall and ceramic tile are two common projects that people often take on and live to regret. Although both seem relatively straightforward, Lipford says you need to have some experience under your belt to get consistent and uniform results. "Even if you do your best and take your time, there will often be flaws in the finished product," says Lipford. "Many people can live with [the flaws], but a lot of people regret that they didn't hire someone." In addition to your skill level, you need to think about how much free time you actually have to work on a project— especially a big one that can expose your home to the elements or that may make part of your home unusable. "If you have an eight-hour project and a full day to do it, that's great. But if you have to do it in two-hour increments, it draws the process out too much, especially when you factor in setup and cleanup," says Lipford. Home The best of both worlds improvement: How to know when it's time to call in a pro A hybrid project helps you save money while putting skilled labor where it's needed: You do the part of the job that doesn't require any specialized skills, and a professional takes on the parts that need more experience. "This is becoming more common," says home improvement expert Danny Lipford. "It's the best of both worlds, because the contractor can do things like plumbing and drywall and installa- tion, leaving you to do the trim, fooring, painting and cleanup. Or the landscaper can do the excavation and terracing, while you do the planting and stone work. You can come up with a hybrid plan for almost any project."

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